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Garden tips: Be kind to pollinators

  • The queen, pictured here in the center of the hive, is the only female with fully developed ovaries. Her primary purposes are to produce chemical scents that help regulate the unity of the colony and lay lots of eggs. Only one queen lives in a given hive.

    The queen, pictured here in the center of the hive, is the only female with fully developed ovaries. Her primary purposes are to produce chemical scents that help regulate the unity of the colony and lay lots of eggs. Only one queen lives in a given hive.
    Photo courtesy of Teresa Kelly

 
By Sharon Robinson
Benton Town and Country Gardeners
Posted on 4/19/2017, 5:00 AM

When most of us think of a pollinator, we think of the honey bee.

However, many other insects contribute to pollination, including several species of butterflies, flies, moths, wasps, beetles, birds, bats and other animals.

Many of these like to make their homes in our homes, especially in spring after the temperature has warmed up. Of course, this is often a problem. Most of us are afraid of being stung and often panic and grab the RAID or a similar lethal solution to our uninvited guests.

As in all situations that come suddenly and catch us off guard, the best solution is to be prepared. Unfortunately, most of us don't know that the name of a local beekeeper is often the answer. Many times a beekeeper will gladly come and attempt to capture the hive, take it home and start a new hive.

In an attempt to help solve this problem, the Town and Country Gardeners are compiling a list of area beekeepers to have available to area residents.

Anyone who is a beekeeper or knows someone who is can email sharonrobi@gmail.com or call Janet Kolisek at 438-9353.

Remember that one-third of our food supply such as nuts, fruits, seeds, vegetables and oils rely on pollination, and they are decreasing in number each year, the honey bee in particular.